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Podcasts and Audiobooks Anyone?


#21

My BFFSWWFYE (best friend since we were four years old) just recommended the Louise Penney books to me, and I’ve finished listening to the first one. Loved it.


#22

I just started Music and Silence. OMG. So good. I love Jenny Agutter, too. Listening to her read the book makes me want to watch the BBC Pride and Prejudice again. :slight_smile:

So I will share my recommendation for Music and Silence which also has ACTUAL KNITTING CONTENT! in addition to its other merits.


#23

The Secret Piano from Mao Labor Camp to Bach is a autobiography of a young girl attending the music conservatory during the Cultural Revolution in China.


#24

I know, I know! Knitting is forbidden! Causes women to be . . . inattentive. What a hoot!

I just loved that. So many wonderful little quirks in this book, and this is one of the sweetest.


#25

Someone on twitter posted a quote from The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans) today, and it was so perfect I went to Audible, listened to samples from several(!) recordings and then spent one of my treasured “credits” on an unabridged recording of the 3-volume work. Sure hope I love it - 20 hours of listening ought to be very helpful for the simple socks I’ll be casting on at the end of this week!


#26

I recently finished Mrs. Queen Takes the Train. It was a fun, light listen: a fictional account of Queen Elizabeth sneaking out of the palace on an adventure. She does yoga in it!!!

A previous listen I should mention is Julian Fellowes’ Belgravia. I thoroughly enjoyed it; some people complained that it was just Downton Abbey repackaged (I don’t agree). Not particularly complex, so a good thing to knit to.

Lastly, Pride and Prejudice, read by Rosamund Pike. I’ve read the paper book a billion times, seen all the movies and I still cried buckets of joy at the end. Utterly brill.


#27

I recently ate a particularly delicious orange.
One thing lead to another and now I’m listening to Commonwealth, written by Ann Patchett and read by Hope Davis.
I read the story when it was first published, but hearing it, anticipating what’s next and being reminded of a forgotten bit of the tale has been a great accompaniment to finishing the border of my little shawl…


#28

Thanks for this. I read Commonwealth a long time ago and never thought of
listening to it. I am glued to a recliner recovering from shoulder
surgery. No knitting for 11 more weeks. Closing my eyes and listening to
Hope Davis read Ann Patchett is just what I need.


#29

I just listened to Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel by Jesmyn Ward. It is divine. Also loving Preet Bahara’s podcast, if you are politically inclined.


#30

I decided to give podcasts a try recently and I really like the podcast Harry Potter and the Sacred Text. I love having something to listen to while I knit. I’ve tried shows and movies, but I get distracted by the picture.


#31

I’m a newbie here, but I love audiobooks & podcasts (and produce podcasts for a living!). The audiobook I listened to last winter - and I am still thinking about it - was The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore by Benjamin Hale (I think?). It’s about a chimpanzee that gains the ability of speech and the book is set up as though he is dictating his memoir. There’s something very Humpert Humpert-esque (from Lolita) about his character. So, not entirely likable, which I find intriguing. Highly recommend!


#32

Audiobooks and knitting is the best! All the enjoyment of TV and knitting without needing to look away from your fiddly cable pattern.

I absolutely adore the Cormoran Strike novels by Robert Galbraith (that’s Rowling’s crime pseudonym) - the stories are excellent and the audiobook narration is brilliant. I could listen to the narrator’s voice all day (and have, repeatedly). I went ahead and purchased a Morse audiobook last week just because the narrator is the same!

Other audiobook recs are “Born a Crime” (autobiography) by Trevor Noah, “American Gods” (fantasy) by Neil Gaiman, and “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” (urban fantasy…ish) by Neil Gaiman - all at least partly self-narrated; and Brian McClellan’s “Sins of Empire” and “Wrath of Empire” (the first 2 of an epic fantasy series)


#33

Just finished those. They are great. I could listen to them again.